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Troubleshoot your Summer vegetable patch

Troubleshoot your summer vegetable patch - image of vegetable patch.

What’s the idea?

If you’re having problems growing your vegetables, this guide may help your vegetable patch produce thrive during the summer months.

What’s the story?

Summer has arrived and we are in the month of the summer solstice, the frosts should have gone and the days are now long.

Like you, I’m on my vegetable patch sowing seeds and planting out.

However, every gardener faces a few problems at some point when growing their vegetables.

From undeveloped or wilting plants to yellowing leaves, there can be plenty of issues.

People should do this because…?

Now is the time to sow runner beans, peas, beetroot, radishes, carrots, spring onions and herbs such as dill and parsley.

You should also be planting out your Brussel sprouts, broccoli, summer cabbage, squash and kale.

With the vagaries of the weather, you should, of course, be vigilant for problems with your plants.

So here are a few of my tips for dealing with problems to ensure a good harvest from your vegetable patch.

How do you do it?

Problems with growing vegetables are often easy to spot and to cure.

Some with be caused by pests, others by disease and some by the environment they are in.

Holes/shredded leaves

This problem will be caused by rodents, slugs, insects, birds, rabbits or deer because they’re all hungry and want to eat your vegetables before you do!

The solution is to protect your crops by fencing, netting or slug bait.

I use floating row covers because they keep the plants warm, exclude pests and act as a windbreak.

Curled leaves

This will probably because by aphids which spread diseases.

Remove the aphids by hand, spray them with water or use insecticide soap.

Also, try planting resistant varieties.

White spots

You may have powdery mildew, a fungal disease that occurs’ when the leaves are dry and the weather humid.

It could be that the plants are too close together so plant them wider apart.

White spots can be caused by spider mites and should be treated by insecticidal soap.

Dark spots

The cause of this is probably chemical burn so take care where and how much fertilizer you use.

Remove any diseased plants.

If the leafs edges look brown this can often be caused by dry soil, salt damage or low temperatures.

Water the plants deeply and thoroughly to freshen the soil.

Slow growing plants

If your plants are light green or yellow, they are not getting sufficient sunlight.

Plants need 6-8 hours of sunlight per day.

Low temperatures or overwatering can also slow your plant’s growth, so improve drainage by adding compost to the soil.

Another option is to grow your crops in raised beds.

Wilting plants

This issue can be caused by dry soil, so water the soil well to a depth of more than 3 inches.

Of course, if the ground is waterlogged stop watering and improves the drainage.

Keeping the garden weeds away will help the plants remain disease-free.

Also rotate crops such as tomatoes, eggplants and potatoes because they can suffer from vascular wilting.

Weak plants

If your plants look spindly this may be caused by too little sunlight, so move the plants from shaded areas.

It’s possible you’ve given them too much water, so stop and improve the drainage.

If the plants are grown too close together they may become weak, so thin them to the spacing recommended on the seed packet.

So give these ideas a try and don’t be discouraged because soon you’ll be producing bumper crops on your vegetable patch.

Stuff you may need

  • Water supply and hosepipe
  • Floating row cover
  • Netting
  • Fencing
  • Slug bait
  • Insecticidal soap

Links to other stuffer pages

Try gardening by the moon phases

Grow herbs in containers

Links to other articles on the web

https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/starting-a-new-vegetable-patch/

Common Garden Plant Diseases

Links to other videos on the web

Links to books

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